where-to-explore-palm-springs

Where to Explore in Palm Springs

Indoor and outdoor experiences await ready to take advantage of your sense of adventure.

Emily Chavous Attractions, Current Guide, Health & Wellness

where-to-explore-palm-springs
Calm the mind and tone the body at Bikram Yoga Plus Palm Springs.
PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY BIKRAM YOGA PLUS PALM SPRINGS

Bikram Yoga Plus Palm Springs

611 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Suite 206
Palm Springs
760-346-2988
coachellayoga.com

Temperature control and bass sounds that vibrate to your core combine for yoga and Pilates experiences that calm the mind and tone the body. Stretch and challenge yourself in classes like hot Bikram and warm Vinyasa, trapeze yoga, disco inferno Pilates, yin yoga, rope wall yoga, and sculpt. Some of the desert’s finest instructors teach in the spacious, spa-like studio, complete with a steam room, lockers, and showers.

& …

Bikram Yoga Plus has a sister location in Palm Desert.

Palm Springs Art Museum

101 N. Museum Drive
Palm Springs
760-322-4800
psmuseum.org

Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center

300 S. Palm Canyon Drive
Palm Springs
760-423-5260
psmuseum.org

When Palm Springs Art Museum opened in 1938 in the La Plaza area downtown, its focus was on natural science exhibits. Now situated in an E. Stewart Williams–designed building against the San Jacinto Mountains, it has become a beacon of fine art and culture. From Oct. 27 to April 30, 2019, it features Unsettled, an exhibition of 200 artworks by 80 artists from across the Greater West — regions with vast expanses of open land, natural resources, and diverse indigenous peoples. Conflicts of their coexistence unfold in five thematic installations.

palmspringsartmuseum
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Lines in the Sand, another season-long exhibition at the museum, explores the history of the desert through our relationship to the land, environment, and community. It highlights the museum’s founding collections of historical indigenous art, depictions of the California desert through painting and photography, and contemporary art inspired by the state’s physical and cultural environment.

art

PHOTOGRAPHS BY @BEARLEADER CHRONICLE

Old Couple on a Bench by Duane Hansen, 1995, polychromed bronze and mixed media with accessories.

In 2011, the museum purchased and transformed another Williams-designed building, downtown’s Santa Fe Federal Savings and Loan, into its Architecture and Design Center. The stunning, 13,000-square-foot glass and steel building with floor-to-ceiling windows opens the exhibition Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse in October. The show, which continues through Jan. 14, 2019, presents creative approaches to repurposing textile industry waste by three women designers from three continents who put sustainability at the heart of the artistic process. Luisa Cevese (Riedizioni, Milan, Italy), Christina Kim (dosa, Los Angeles, USA), and Reiko Sudo (NUNO, Tokyo, Japan) share a profound respect for scraps as repositories of raw materials, energy, labor, and creativity.

palmspringsartmuseumexterior
Tahquitz Canyon

500 W. Mesquite Ave.
Palm Springs
760-416-7044
tahquitzcanyon.com

Beautiful and serene Tahquitz Canyon is located a short distance from downtown Palm Springs. The canyon offers a rare glimpse into the ancestral home of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. Today, this canyon is a popular hiking spot, steering explorers from its opening at West Mesquite Road in Palm Springs to the majestic waterfall 350 feet up the rocky trail. Discover the amazing scenery along the rugged 2-mile trail loop. Find respite at the 60-foot-tall Tahquitz Falls — a place of power that rejuvenates and energizes.

DID YOU KNOW?

The average temperature of the waterfall ranges from 51 to 58 degrees, while the average water flow varies depending upon weather conditions.

tahquitzcanyon

PHOTOGRAPH BY @BEARLEADER CHRONICLE

Palm Springs Air Museum
745 N. Gene Autry Trail
Palm Springs
760-778-6262
palmspringsairmuseum.org

This living history museum houses 59 World War II–, Korea- and, Vietnam-era military aircraft. Its 86,000 square feet of climate-controlled hangars contain most of the planes and displays. Most planes are still air-worthy, and flight exhibitions take off Saturdays from November through May after guest speaker programs.

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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY PALM SPRINGS AIR MUSEUM

Meet museum docents that flew the planes during the wars, who share captivating stories with visitors. Open daily, the museum’s most popular events are the Veterans’ Day Air Fair, Memorial Day Flower Drop, and November Props and Hops Craft Beer Festival. Guests can book a ride on the vintage Warbird C-47 Skytrain or P-51D Mustang. Be part of history, not a spectator!

DID YOU KNOW?
Palm Springs Air Museum is available as an event venue, complete with hangar access and a theater.

palmspringsairmuseum

PHOTOGRAPH BY NEIL HUSVAR

Indian Canyons

38500 S. Palm Canyon Drive
Palm Springs
760-323-6018
indian-canyons.com

A short drive from downtown Palm Springs, past the bustle and through the vast open desert, a beautiful oasis rises from the San Jacinto foothills.

On land that has been preserved by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, trails switchback through pristine scenery, from gorges and barren desertscape to waterfalls and the world’s largest grouping of Washingtonia filifera palm trees.

The Indian Canyons comprise the Palm, Andreas, and Murray canyons. It is time-honored ground, designated as such in 1973 when Andreas Canyon became part of the National Register of Historic Places.

The region was once inhabited by the ancestors of the Agua Caliente people, who were drawn to the shelter of its jagged cliffs and the shade of its lush palm groves. Remnants of irrigation ditches, ceremonial sites, homes, and rock art remain in the area today.

Pack a picnic and plan to linger for a few hours. You can pick up a trail map at the Palm Canyon Trading Post, as well as mementos and collectibles such as artisan pottery, baskets, and jewelry.

indiancanyons

PHOTOGRAPH BY @BEARLEADER CHRONICLE

Bike Palm Springs

194 S. Indian Canyon Drive

Palm Springs
760-832-8912
bikepsrentals.com

Fit in with the easy desert lifestyle on a colorful cruiser and explore the iconic neighborhoods of this modernist mecca. Located in the center of town, Bike Palm Springs has an assortment of bicycles including beach cruisers, mountain, road, tandem, or hybrids. Those who need an extra boost can also rent an electric bike. Kids’ bikes and tag-along trailers are available too. All rentals include a lock and trail map, and helmets are available upon request.

bikepalmsprings

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY BIKE PALM SPRINGS

Backstreet Art District

2600 S. Cherokee Way

Palm Springs
760-328-4144
backstreetartdistrict.com

For more than 14 years, Palm Springs’ Backstreet Art District has been home to a unique community of artist-owned galleries and studios that offer up a delicious variety of eye candy for art lovers, including paintings and works of ceramic, glass, wood, and metal.

Spa Resort Casino

401 E. Amado Road
Palm Springs
760-321-2000
888-999-1995
sparesortcasino.com

The hottest slots in the coolest setting are waiting for you at Spa Resort Casino along with a variety of table games and high-limit gaming. For music lovers, the Cascade Lounge draws those craving a retro-lounge feel infused with the best new sounds. Outdoor entertainment includes the annual Concerts Under the Palms series and a spectacular New Year’s Eve Block Party.

casino

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY SPA RESORT CASINO

Palm Springs Aerial Tramway

1 Tram Way
Palm Springs
888-515-8726
pstramway.com

This engineering marvel all started in 1935 with an electrical engineer named Francis Crocker. While visiting nearby Banning with newspaper publisher Carl Barkow, Crocker stared up 10,834 feet at Mount San Jacinto’s snowcapped peak and commented that he wished to “go up there where it’s nice and cool.” That daydream became a blueprint for the tram, which opened in 1963 and has since seen more than 20 million passengers travel through 5 climate and ecological zones in just 10 minutes to reach year-round recreation.

DID YOU KNOW?
Twenty-six months of construction were required to erect Palm Springs Aerial Tramway’s towers and valley and mountain stations, involving 23,000 helicopter missions and $8.15 million in private funds.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY @BEARLEADER CHRONICLE